Category Archives: Words and Phrases

MURDER AT THE DINNER TABLE, MANNERS, KNIVES, FORKS…AND “COURTESY.”

Jerry Anderson   March 9, 2016   Comments Off on MURDER AT THE DINNER TABLE, MANNERS, KNIVES, FORKS…AND “COURTESY.”

Until the early 1600s knives that were placed at a dinner table had sharp points. Many people ate with their hands and had no utensils of any kind. In France during the reign of King Louis XIII a famous historical figure named Duc de Richelieu ( better known to us as Cardinal Richelieu) was both a Cardinal of the Catholic… Read more »

Why do we say “God bless you” when someone sneezes?

Jerry Anderson   February 29, 2016   Comments Off on Why do we say “God bless you” when someone sneezes?

In the 7th century A.D. it was common practice for people to respond to someone sneezing by saying words that meant, in effect, “congratulations,” “good job,” or “way to go.” This was done because it was believed that sneezing was the body’s attempt to expel the devil or an evil spirit from the body. Sneezing was a positive thing, the… Read more »

What Did Jesus Actually Look Like? Plus, Prayer And The Pretzel.

Jerry Anderson   February 24, 2016   Comments Off on What Did Jesus Actually Look Like? Plus, Prayer And The Pretzel.

The word “Christ” comes from the Greek word “christos” which means “messiah.” Forensic anthropologists, geneticists, and other scientists have come up with a picture of Jesus much different from the one most of us are familiar with (such as the one below). Using the best techniques available to science, they have come up with a “best guess” image of what… Read more »

The “hammock.” Where does that word come from?

Jerry Anderson   February 19, 2016   Comments Off on The “hammock.” Where does that word come from?

When Columbus and his men reached the West Indies in 1492, they found the natives sleeping in hanging beds called “hamacas.” Sailors borrowed this idea immediately for two good reasons. First, it made it possible for them to avoid sleeping on the often wet and filthy floors and decks of their ships. Second,  it was a way to prevent rats,… Read more »

WHY IS A DRUNKARD CALLED A “LUSH”?

Jerry Anderson   February 16, 2016   Comments Off on WHY IS A DRUNKARD CALLED A “LUSH”?

  Dr. Thomas Lushington, was an English clergyman/chaplain who was widely and famously known to like his liquor, and indulged himself deeply and frequently in this singular vice. He lived from 1590 to 1661, a long life for that time in history and, it can be speculated, it was a result of his penchant for drink. Water was not safe… Read more »